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Author Topic: The Cook Photo  (Read 123740 times)

Gus Rubio

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #30 on: July 01, 2013, 09:12:43 AM »

It seems to me that there would be clear indications of three spokes in the unkown object; if the perimeter of the yoke is heavily encrusted, then it should be reasonable to expect that the spokes would look about the same.  It looks like there might be one overgrown spoke running from the center of the circular object towards the 6-7-o'clock position (C4 on Ric's grid), but I don't see the other 2 spokes.  This may of course mean nothing.

Now, the yoke is probaby made from welded tubular steel or aluminum, right?  Would tubular metals like these last long enough to allow the kind of marine growth we're seeing in the image?
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C.W. Herndon

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #31 on: July 01, 2013, 09:21:28 AM »

Ric is correct, the Red Snapper is native of the Gulf of Mexico and Eastern Seaboard.

Chris, here is another interesting article about the red snapper from the National Geographic.
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Ric Gillespie

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #32 on: July 01, 2013, 09:30:37 AM »

Now, the yoke is probaby made from welded tubular steel or aluminum, right?  Would tubular metals like these last long enough to allow the kind of marine growth we're seeing in the image?

Now that you mention it, I think the yokes were made of wood covered with leather.  If so, fagetaboutit.
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Chris Johnson

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #33 on: July 01, 2013, 09:34:04 AM »

Ric is correct, the Red Snapper is native of the Gulf of Mexico and Eastern Seaboard.

Chris, here is another interesting article about the red snapper from the National Geographic.

So much for Wikipedia then!!!!

Thanks :)
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Tim Collins

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #34 on: July 01, 2013, 09:38:37 AM »

I should think that someone familiar with the type of vegetation in the image may be able to give a more accurate idea as to the size and scale in the image, than using the fish. 
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Ric Gillespie

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #35 on: July 01, 2013, 09:38:53 AM »

Chris, here is another interesting article about the red snapper from the National Geographic.

I stand corrected.  Next question, how big do those Pacific red snapper get?
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Gus Rubio

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #36 on: July 01, 2013, 10:41:10 AM »

Now, the yoke is probaby made from welded tubular steel or aluminum, right?  Would tubular metals like these last long enough to allow the kind of marine growth we're seeing in the image?

Now that you mention it, I think the yokes were made of wood covered with leather.  If so, fagetaboutit.

Would AE's plane have carried the factory-installed yokes?  What kind of yokes do the Electra survivors have?

I saw video of a replica of the AE plane (studied by the Waitt Inst., do we know which number plane that is?), and it had round yokes (compared to the flattened-bottom ones in AE's plane) with a wooden rim and metal spokes (black with silvery scratches indicating paint).  The joint where the wood meets the metal spoke is clearly visible.  Those could be either recent additions done with the restoration or some kind of factory option, my uneducated guess would be the former.
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Doug Giese

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #37 on: July 01, 2013, 10:53:47 AM »

I am inclined to believe it may be an engine with cowling circling the central propeller shaft. Looks like three cylinders (at 8, 12 and 2 o'clock) have been forced forward.

Here's a photo of the engine from the Purdue Archives. I thought this might be the object when I first saw it. But, the entire body of the engine would have  would have to be deeply embedded in coral, or the front section somehow became separated. I don't know how the engine is assembled but I don't think it's possible for just the front end to have been sheared off of the main body. The cowling maybe, but not with the prop shaft geometry intact.

A yoke is an interesting possibility, if it could last that long underwater.

If the object is circular, there appears to be too much buildup of crud between the left side (B3-B4) and right side of the object (E3-E4). See Rick's Grid here . I'd expect a similar amount of crud buildup on both sides.

I was fooled by the image of a tire before (click here for explanation). The object in a video correlated almost perfectly with the Electra tire. But, when the object was viewed from a different angle it was clearly composed of three unrelated objects.

For the type of fish I'd trust the New England Aquarium.

My vote is it's interesting, probably nothing, but worth a look if you can find the object without wasting too much time.




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Joe Cerniglia

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #38 on: July 01, 2013, 11:24:43 AM »

Now, the yoke is probaby made from welded tubular steel or aluminum, right?  Would tubular metals like these last long enough to allow the kind of marine growth we're seeing in the image?

Now that you mention it, I think the yokes were made of wood covered with leather.  If so, fagetaboutit.

The hub and at least the portion of spoke radiating from the hub appears to have been some sort of metal.  There is also some sort of outer casing or sheath on the spoke visible in this photo, and a rope-like twiny thing (Lockheed technical term) threaded into a hole in the casing.  The casing looks rugged and could be a dry shell-like leather.  If the spokes are wood, then they would need to be attached to the metal hub.  Without better documentation of the specifications of this part, I suppose anything is possible.

Joe Cerniglia
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C.W. Herndon

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #39 on: July 01, 2013, 12:32:49 PM »

I stand corrected.  Next question, how big do those Pacific red snapper get?

Ric, it appears that the most common type snapper found on Niku might be of Genus/species Lutjanus bohar.

Detailed information can be found in the reference above. It is estimated that they may live to be as much as 55 years old.

Max length= 90cm ~36"
Common length= 76cm ~ 30"
Max weight= 12.5kg ~ 27lbs
Woody (former 3316R)
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Ric Gillespie

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #40 on: July 01, 2013, 12:40:08 PM »

Max length= 90cm ~36"
Common length= 76cm ~ 30"
Max weight= 12.5kg ~ 27lbs

Well, 36 inches is better than 8 -10 inches for a squirrel fish.  I'm no ichthyologist, heaven knows,  but this guy doesn't look much like Lujanus bohar to me.  Proportions look wrong and his eyes are too big.
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Doug Giese

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #41 on: July 01, 2013, 01:14:18 PM »

Here's a Squirrelfish Description (slow link). Note it has "Very large eyes". It is reported as typically being 36 cm (14.2") long worldwide, but there seems to be a lot of sub-species.

Go with the experts! Photo: Jeff.  Fish: an Aquarium.

[Edited to correct ftp link].
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« Last Edit: July 01, 2013, 01:58:58 PM by Bruce Thomas »
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Chris Johnson

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #42 on: July 01, 2013, 01:19:01 PM »

Ric is correct, the Red Snapper is native of the Gulf of Mexico and Eastern Seaboard.

The object appears round and has some 'depth to it' something nags the back of my mind about the colony having wheeled objects to do with the fishing canoes.

Found it (what I was looking for) WOF

See picture, deepish spooked wheel.
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Ric Gillespie

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #43 on: July 01, 2013, 01:23:11 PM »

See picture, deepish spooked wheel.

We're all in deep and a little bit spooked.  As I recall that wheel was near the old carpenter's shop just inland on the south side of the main passage. 
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Chris Johnson

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Re: The Cook Photo
« Reply #44 on: July 01, 2013, 01:26:37 PM »

Something like it could be a contender, it was just nagging at my neurones  ;D
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