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Author Topic: Anyone know what this plane is?  (Read 45485 times)

Neff Jacobs

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #30 on: April 08, 2015, 04:46:52 PM »

I dug in my notes and found a quote from Sound of Wings, no page number. A Wire dated Feb 13 , 1937 ,Putnam to De Sibour ,  London , " Fuel consumption normal cruising speed per hour by weight 310 lb."   310/6=51.6 GPH   These notes are yellow so from way back.  Context justifying heavy fuel loads over British Territory.   Max cruse for the engines would be 64 gph so it is not simply a claim for all it could burn.

Still looking for Darwin news papers.
Neff


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Bob Smith

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #31 on: April 08, 2015, 05:53:44 PM »

shweizer 233A glider Air Force used for training??
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Martin X. Moleski, SJ

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #32 on: April 08, 2015, 06:02:56 PM »

And now, to keep myself somewhat close to the subject - what plane is THIS?

This Wikimedia Commons file has the photo with the caption: "United States Air Force Academy Schweizer 1-26B N2408W used by the cadets for flight training of gliding."

N1320, below, is said to be a Schweizer 1-26B, too.







LTM,

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« Last Edit: April 09, 2015, 06:03:52 AM by Martin X. Moleski, SJ »
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Neff Jacobs

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #33 on: April 08, 2015, 07:51:21 PM »

The Air Force told us enlisted types teaching the cadets to fly gliders made better pilots of them.  It would appear to give a feel for kinetic vs potential energy. 
Neff
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JNev

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #34 on: April 09, 2015, 05:40:56 AM »

126B it is!

Delightful little bird.

I found that flying gliders made me a much better pilot.  You become far more attuned to energy state and how to manage more effectively.
- Jeff Neville

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Bob Smith

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #35 on: April 09, 2015, 07:36:32 AM »

Bob S.
 
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Martin X. Moleski, SJ

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #36 on: April 09, 2015, 09:40:40 AM »

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USAF_Academy_2-33A_N2408W.jpg

I'm just confused??

Yes, you are.  :)

There is a discrepancy between the FILE name ("2-33A") and the CAPTION.

Although I am a believer, I don't believe everything I read.  So I went to see what a Schweizer 2-33 looks like.  It is a two-person, high-wing glider.  The tail is superficially similar to the 1-26B, and maybe the planform of the wings, but the fuselage and windscreen/canopy are dramatically different because of the wing location.

It took me a while even to accept the CAPTION on the photo as correct because there are many pictures allegedly of the 1-26B that show a rounded tail and a very different canopy than in the photo given us by Jeff.  It was only after I found the picture of the white glider with an N-number associated with a 1-26B in the FAA registry that I figured I had the right classification for the photo.

LTM,

           Marty
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JNev

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #37 on: April 09, 2015, 10:41:22 AM »

Great sleuthing Marty!

Wasn't sure anyone would get it down to the "Bravo" model - excellent.
- Jeff Neville

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JNev

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #38 on: April 09, 2015, 10:46:40 AM »

I dug in my notes and found a quote from Sound of Wings, no page number. A Wire dated Feb 13 , 1937 ,Putnam to De Sibour ,  London , " Fuel consumption normal cruising speed per hour by weight 310 lb."   310/6=51.6 GPH   These notes are yellow so from way back.  Context justifying heavy fuel loads over British Territory.   Max cruse for the engines would be 64 gph so it is not simply a claim for all it could burn.

Still looking for Darwin news papers.
Neff

Thanks, Neff.  I wouldn't say this is a done deal by any means and realize it may always be anecdotal, but it is interesting.  If truly a habit despite all the Kelly Johnson efforts to educate her, 52 GPH would have not been good news to Earhart after about 21 hours and a few minutes.
- Jeff Neville

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Bob Smith

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #39 on: April 09, 2015, 11:57:54 AM »

Thankyou Marty and Jeff. I'll not believe Wiki again!
Bob S.
 
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Martin X. Moleski, SJ

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #40 on: April 09, 2015, 02:56:33 PM »

Thankyou Marty and Jeff. I'll not believe Wiki again!

I love wikiworld!  That's why we have the Ameliapedia.  But it does pay to test things before you put much weight on them.   :)
LTM,

           Marty
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JNev

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #41 on: April 09, 2015, 04:15:49 PM »

Excellent lesson on depth of test, good father - and many thanks for your guiding mind in helping to make Ameliapedia what it is for us.

Thanks to TIGHAR for resources like that, and the many cool historic items in the 'library', truly. 

And...

What is THIS one -

- Jeff Neville

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Martin X. Moleski, SJ

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #42 on: April 09, 2015, 05:22:31 PM »

What is THIS one -

First approximation: a Stearman-Hammond Y-1S (Y-150) – from 1937 (!).

"The 'Flivver' was designed by Dean B. Hammond for a 'safe airplane' contest held by the Bureau of Air Commerce in 1934. Hammond won the contest and received a contract for 25 aircraft at $3,190 each. [The original design goal was for an airplane cost of $700]. The first airplane delivered was not acceptable to the Bureau, and Lloyd Stearman was asked to re-engineer the plane to improve performance and general workmanship. Thus was formed the Stearman-Hammond Aircraft Corporation in 1936. The first aircraft was powered by a 125hp engine. The performance was not impressive so it was re-engined with a 150hp. Although designed to be easy to fly, the high price (eventually $7,150) meant only 20 aircraft were sold at the depth of the Depression. Two Y-1S were used for radio controlled development trials by the United States Navy as the JH-1.  The Royal Air Force also evaluated a Y-1S in the 1940s."

Smithsonian example:

LTM,

           Marty
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« Last Edit: April 09, 2015, 05:30:21 PM by Martin X. Moleski, SJ »
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JNev

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #43 on: April 09, 2015, 11:19:27 PM »

You are the MAN and 'Stearman Hammond' was what I was hoping for, as the more obscure "JH-1" would have been a bit steep.

Excellent.
- Jeff Neville

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Friend Weller

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Re: Anyone know what this plane is?
« Reply #44 on: April 10, 2015, 07:33:43 AM »

I couldn't resist.....



Friend
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