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 11 
 on: February 07, 2018, 11:52:58 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Ric Gillespie
Unless a qualified forensic anthropologist can find significant errors in Jantz's methodology it is very hard to conceive of a reasonable argument against AE being on Niku. In particular when this data is combined with the other archaeological evidence gathered by TIGHAR over the years it is really  overwhelming.

I agree, and it's hard to imagine anyone more qualified than Jantz to make this assessment.  It will be interesting to see how the media respond.

 12 
 on: February 07, 2018, 11:32:01 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Matt Revington
I just  finished my first read through of the paper, very impressive both in the explanation of the source of possible errors in Hoodless's work and in the high degree of probability that the bones were AE's.  Unless a qualified forensic anthropologist can find significant errors in Jantz's methodology it is very hard to conceive of a reasonable argument against AE being on Niku. In particular when this data is combined with the other archaeological evidence gathered by TIGHAR over the years it is really  overwhelming.

 13 
 on: February 07, 2018, 09:50:28 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Ric Gillespie
Dr. Jantz's paper has been published. 

“This analysis reveals that Earhart is more similar to the Nikumaroro bones than 99% of individuals in a large reference sample.”

“Amelia Earhart and the Nikumaroro Bones - A 1941 Analysis versus Modern Quantitative Techniques” is open access and can be downloaded at http://journals.upress.ufl.edu/fa/article/view/525

Richard L. Jantz PhD, is Professor Emeritus and Director Emeritus at the University of Tennessee Forensic Anthropology Center. The university’s Anthropological Research Facility, famously known as “The Body Farm,” was founded by Dr. William Bass. The donated body program was established in 1981 as a means of studying factors that affect human decomposition and to develop a skeletal collection of modern Americans. Many of the skeletons used to characterize Amelia Earhart were from the donated collection.

In 2005, Richard Jantz and Stephen Ousley created Fordisc, a computer program for estimating sex, ancestry, and stature from skeletal measurements. Now in version 3.1, Fordisc, is used by nearly every board certified forensic anthropologist in the United States and many around the world.

The full press release is on the TIGHAR homepage.

 14 
 on: January 23, 2018, 11:04:00 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Ric Gillespie
I really wanted to get the writing finished by the end of 2017 but events intervened that required my attention – primarily, negotiating agreements related to the unconventional 2017 expedition to Nikumaroro; responding to the bogus History Channel documentary; and providing historical research and forensic support for Dr. Jantz’s forthcoming anthropological paper on the identity of the castaway whose bones were found in 1940.  That work is now completed and I’ve been able to resume writing.

I've now completed the draft of Chapter Three “The Realization of a Dream “ March - July 1936
If you'll go to
https://tighar.org/Publications/Books/FA2/chapterlist.html
you'll find PDFs of the three completed chapters.  Please give them a read and let me know what you think.

There are five more chapters to be written:

Chapter Four: Teething Troubles  August 1936 - September 1936
Chapter Five: The Flying Laboratory  October 1936 - February 1937
Chapter Six:  “Honolulu crack-up” March 1937
Chapter Seven: “Like broken bones” April 1937 – May 1937
Chapter Eight:   “One more good flight” May 1937 - June 1937

About Chapter Three
The earlier chapters deal with Lockheed’s development of the Model 10 Electra and the negotiations that resulted in Purdue University’s sponsorship of Earhart’s Model 10E Special.  Those chapters are necessarily text-heavy with relatively few photos.  In Chapter Three, the Earhart airplane becomes a reality. Presenting photos of Amelia and the Electra in their correct historical context makes images that are familiar to anyone who has followed the Earhart saga more informative and poignant. Chapter Three also introduces the first of many full color illustrations of the Electra derived from the meticulous drawings made by TIGHAR member Bill Harney.

Photos, Illustrations, and Documents
As with the first two chapters, the layout of Chapter Three as presented in the PDF is for review purposes.  We expect the final, printed book to be in a large-format coffee-table style.  Photos and illustrations will be much larger than in these draft versions.  The printed book will also include an appendix with easy-to-read facsimiles of all the historical paperwork on the airplane including Lockheed forms and memoranda and Bureau of Air Commerce license applications, inspection reports, certificates and correspondence.

About the book in general
This book is a “prequel” to my 2006 book “Finding Amelia – The True Story of the Earhart Disappearance” published by the Naval Institute Press.  I have decided to end the book with the June 1, 1937 takeoff from Miami that began the second ill-fated world flight attempt.  I covered the world flight itself, the disappearance, and the government search in my first book.  No need to re-plow that ground.

Like the first book, this is an exhaustively researched and footnoted history book that presents the documented facts in what I hope is an engaging, easy-to-follow narrative.

This is a story that has never been fully told. This book should clear up common misconceptions and mythology about the Earhart Electra but, more importantly, permit a better understanding of why the Earhart saga ended in tragedy.

How soon I can get the remaining chapters written will largely depend on how the fundraising goes, but I’m hoping to have Chapter Four ready for review in February.

 15 
 on: January 18, 2018, 08:09:07 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Ric Gillespie
This chart is from an article in a 1941 issue of QST (ham radio magazine) about how poor sending technique can result in confused messages.  The chart shows which letters can easily be mistaken for other letter combinations.

It may help us identify probable errors in how the poorly sent 281 Message - Message 125 in the Post Loss Radio Signals Catalog - was interpreted by U.S. Navy operators.

 16 
 on: January 16, 2018, 08:26:07 PM 
Started by Martin X. Moleski, SJ - Last post by Dennis M Spragg
Will do.

Dennis

 17 
 on: January 16, 2018, 06:24:03 PM 
Started by Martin X. Moleski, SJ - Last post by Andrew M McKenna
Dennis

Next time you head out to Boulder, let me know.  Would love to share coffee or lunch with you.

Best

Andrew

 18 
 on: January 16, 2018, 08:38:49 AM 
Started by Martin X. Moleski, SJ - Last post by Dennis M Spragg
Hello Andrew!

Glad to meet you, too and thank you for your kind welcome.

I commute to Boulder from my primary residence in Milton, MA.

Dennis

 19 
 on: January 15, 2018, 08:16:30 AM 
Started by Martin X. Moleski, SJ - Last post by Andrew M McKenna
Welcome Dennis

Are you in Boulder where the Archive is housed, or are you somewhere else?

Best

Andrew

 20 
 on: January 11, 2018, 02:54:38 PM 
Started by Richard Lyon Metzger - Last post by Dennis M Spragg
The History Detectives program was a pleasure to appear in and assist. I was concerned because of having a forthcoming book but the producers agreed not to touch about 90% of what I was preparing. They preserved the integrity of the book, for which I was very grateful.

So, for example, they drew a line to not include the conclusive information about the Lancasters that I already had and, as with the Anderton logbook, they opted to present a 15-20 minute "bump" in flight time for the C-64 to the southwest along the required transport route rather than completely throw dear Roy Nesbit under the bus. Roy was still alive when the program segments were recorded during the summer and fall of 2013 and he passed in the spring of 2014 before the episode aired on PBS (July 2014). But I already knew the Lancsters were completely out of the picture, given BST vs. GMT and the clearly evident AAF and RAF documentation for that day. I knew at the time the Lancasters were all back at their aerodromes by 14:45A and the jettisons were all logged in squadron records between 13:04A and 13:21A, with some errant drops to the east and north of the jettison coordinates right over the western transport corridor and a ferry flight of Ninth Air Force L-1 aircraft, which was reported at the time, even in the February 1, 1945 issue of Stars and Stripes. The 149 Squadron Lancaster with Fred Shaw aboard, the navigator who claimed to see a Norseman go into the water, was back on the ground at Methwold and logged in at 14:20A.

The producers spent considerable time with the alleged clandestine operations angle for Miller, considering that the AAF Band was billeted in Bedford along with many BBC operations and Bedfordshire was coincidentally the location of some special operations activities. The closest Miller got to anything resembling anti-enemy activity were Office of War Information Voice of America ABSIE (American Broadcasting Station in Europe) broadcasts in the German language, which he did not speak. ABSIE was the wartime London-based European Service of the VOA.

One thing the producers also did that I appreciated was the hands-on visit with a flyable Norseman in Canada and I will never forget the pilot telling us that ice can easily form in the engine (and all over the aircraft) and that the old float-type carburetors originally on the plane were nasty. That and getting into a Lancaster did quite a bit to further my hands-on appreciation for the aircraft involved.

But the History Detectives episode is a mostly OK introduction before getting into further detail and the book.

Dennis

 

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