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 11 
 on: October 18, 2018, 11:22:17 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Bill Mangus
This is a vintage Bell & Howell 16mm projector external speaker on eBay.  Model number may not be what CG was using but this certainly looks old.  Second picture (not terribly well focused) shows external speaker connection cable.  Looks close to Joe's find ?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Bell-Howell-Filmosound-179-16mm-Sound-In-Film-Projector-/153210890616?oid=232767131589


 12 
 on: October 18, 2018, 11:11:54 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Ric Gillespie
Detail of transmitter connection.

 13 
 on: October 18, 2018, 11:05:42 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Ric Gillespie
This is the only photo we know of that shows the connections to the transmitter.  The unused ("no connection") port was for the transmitter to be linked with the receiver so that the dorsal vee antenna could serve for both transmitting and receiving.  Instead, the receiver on NR16020 (located under the copilot seat) was independent of the transmitter and had it's own antenna on the belly (the one that was lost on takeoff from Lae).

 14 
 on: October 18, 2018, 10:39:50 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Bill Mangus
Ah, yes!  You can just see the bottom of the key in my second picture, mostly hidden by her right hand.

Those "connectors" to the key do seem a bit thin.  I wonder if they're not more of a "stiffener" to keep the wires from bending at the point of connection.

I didn't follow the above discussion about what the schematics show as likely connections at the transmitter.  Is Joe's find still in the running there?


 15 
 on: October 18, 2018, 10:21:15 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Ric Gillespie
As shown in this photo taken before the first world flight attempt, a Morse key was mounted beside the right seat in the cockpit. Two wires are plugged into the unit. The connector for the top one appears to be a bit skinnier than the lower one. The Amphenol connector found on Niku looks way too big to be either one of them.
There may have been a second key at the nav station in the cabin, but the connections would be similar

 16 
 on: October 18, 2018, 10:04:52 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Bill Mangus
Found pictures of transmitter and radio control panel in cockpit.

In the second picture you can see the radio control panel just below her left hand.


 17 
 on: October 18, 2018, 08:42:37 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Bill Mangus
Found a Western Electric Telegraph Key using this as Google search term.


 18 
 on: October 18, 2018, 08:29:51 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Bill Mangus
Let me throw out another idea for consideration.

Ric's diagram of the dash control panel has a switch marked "Voice/CW", obviously used to select between a microphone or a telegraphers key as an input to the transmitter.  As I understand it, wiring for a key would be less complicated than for a microphone. 

We know AE/FN were not proficient in Morse Code.  The dash control panel was likely made with a CW option for use by someone, presumably  Harry Manning, for the first attempt.  I think the most likely place for the installation of the key would have been on the nav table in the back end of the aircraft as the key would need a firm, stable mounting to be used properly.  I cannot be sure of that but putting it up front with no surface to rest it on seems unlikely.  This option would also require another wire pair going back for a headset for whom ever was sending Morse Code.  Maybe that was too complicated and the key was used in the right seat up front where a headset/earphones were available.  (Did they even have/use a headset?  I seem to recall a picture of AE holding something to her ear while sitting in the left seat.)

If there was never any intention for anyone in either attempt to use CW, that argues the case that the dash controls were "standard" for a Western Electric installation and they or their successor may have pictures/plans somewhere.

If installed at the nav table that means there was a long wire running from the transmitter behind the cockpit to the table. I'm guessing that after the ground loop in Hawaii it was never removed.  That may be what was later scavenged by the colonists for use elsewhere.

Without looking for pictures of any period telegraphers keys, I seem to remember the connection at the key being stripped wires held on with knurled nuts on screw posts.  Joe's connector could have been used at the transmitter end.

Just another idea. . . .

Further searching. . . Harney's drawing of the Electra interior shows the transmitter located nearly underneath the nav table and a "lead to transmitter" annotated.  The longest wire would then be from the cockpit location of the of the control panel back to the transmitter.  Harney's drawing doesn't show a telegraphers key, as such, but that "lead to transmitter" could be for the key.

Still looking for a photo of nav table prior to takeoff on first attempt to see if key and headphones are shown.



 19 
 on: October 18, 2018, 07:35:22 AM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Ric Gillespie
I wonder if the single pin Amphenol connector was used on the cockpit end of the wiring loom to connect to the remote head.

Bill Mangus wonders:
"The switches depicted in the diagram in Ric's post appear to be a simple on/off or A/B type.  They would have controlled relays inside the transmitter which would perform the desired switching.  As such, these switches would not need a lot of power (12v/24v?).  I'd bet they were wired with a pair of wires to a terminal block on the backside.  No need for a fancy connector and there may have been space issues behind the dash as well."

Now as to why it remained or was salvaged....the wiring loom could have had more use in the value of the long length of wire as a construction material where the panel and its switches wouldn't have that same value (being careful of my use and intent of the words 'could' and 'would').  I wonder as to why the connector was pulled off of its associated wiring as it does not appear to have been cut.

Wherever the connector came from, I agree that the wire it was once attached to was probably what the salvager was after as construction material.  As to why the connector was pulled off rather than cut, the most likely explanation is that the salvager didn't have a tool to cut the wire with.  These guys were extremely tools-poor.

 20 
 on: October 17, 2018, 08:40:00 PM 
Started by Ric Gillespie - Last post by Friend Weller


1/4" two conductor and three conductor phone plugs are not the same as the Amphenol connector of the picture.

James, you are correct about J11, the transmitter chassis mic jack.  I also notice that pin 6 of the rear chassis connector is in parallel with J11, in essense a mic extension connection.  The same applies to some other transmitter functions being extended.  I wonder if the single pin Amphenol connector was used on the cockpit end of the wiring loom to connect to the remote head.

Now as to why it remained or was salvaged....the wiring loom could have had more use in the value of the long length of wire as a construction material where the panel and its switches wouldn't have that same value (being careful of my use and intent of the words 'could' and 'would').  I wonder as to why the connector was pulled off of its associated wiring as it does not appear to have been cut.

Boy, is it hard to write on this teeny screen but Potato, Idaho is beautiful in the fall...

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