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Author Topic: Temperatures on Gardner  (Read 47306 times)

Thom Boughton

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #30 on: July 15, 2012, 11:52:53 PM »

Searching for water and food would be a good reason to be moving around inland from the beach, but you wouldn't want to be doing it in the heat of the day if you can avoid it.  Mornings and evenings and overnight would be the best times.......


Indeed!! 

With the heat being what it is on Niku....I could see where finding water became important very quickly.  Surely whatever water they had with them (assuming there was any appreciable amount of it left upon arrival) didn't last long at all....even with careful rationing.





tb
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Gary LaPook

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #31 on: July 16, 2012, 12:31:49 AM »



It appears to me by all reasonable observations, therefore, that Niku can be a very hot - even stifling place to live.


LTM -
I don't know, the settlers lived there with no problem for many decades.

gl
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Martin X. Moleski, SJ

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #32 on: July 16, 2012, 01:39:23 AM »

I don't know, the settlers lived there with no problem for many decades.

1938-1963 = 25 years

They left, in part, because of insufficient water.  Cf. "Paradise Lost":

"Maude is disappointed to see that a severe drought has turned the lush paradise he had seen in 1937 into a parched and hostile landscape" (1938).

"Yet another severe drought damages the coconut plantations and prompts a British decision to abandon the colony" (1963).
LTM,

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« Last Edit: July 16, 2012, 01:43:36 AM by Martin X. Moleski, SJ »
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Tom Swearengen

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #33 on: July 16, 2012, 06:41:40 AM »

Doc---I certainly agree about the temperatures. I also agree with andrew and others that have been there, ans can attest to the condidtions on Niku. Paradise it isnt. I would also agree with your statement about ship decks being hot-----My dad was EOD going to Cuba during the crisis. Yep I remember well----
Tom Swearengen TIGHAR # 3297
 
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Tom Swearengen

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #34 on: July 16, 2012, 08:29:18 AM »

Jeff---I think Niku in the summer would be like the weather we've had here----100*, high humidity. Difference would be a sea breeze==maybe. But away from the shoreline, back in the scaveola, I would think would be pretty miserable. I'll defer to those that have been there, but Id say pretty warm. AND---if stuck inside the Electra ---would be maybe 125*+. Not fun.
Does add some credence to the radio signals at nite. Might actually be pleasant there in the evening---but again I'll defer to Andrew and others that have been there.
Tom
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Gary LaPook

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #35 on: July 16, 2012, 10:55:48 AM »

I don't know, the settlers lived there with no problem for many decades.

1938-1963 = 25 years

They left, in part, because of insufficient water.  Cf. "Paradise Lost":

"Maude is disappointed to see that a severe drought has turned the lush paradise he had seen in 1937 into a parched and hostile landscape" (1938).

"Yet another severe drought damages the coconut plantations and prompts a British decision to abandon the colony" (1963).
Drought does not equal unbearably high temperatures.

gl
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Jeff Victor Hayden

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #36 on: July 16, 2012, 11:12:24 AM »

Drought does not equal unbearably high temperatures.

True enough Gary but enduring drought even in moderately high temperatures requires quite a bit of H2o.
This must be the place
 
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Gary LaPook

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #37 on: July 16, 2012, 11:14:06 AM »

Jeff---I think Niku in the summer would be like the weather we've had here----100*, high humidity. Difference would be a sea breeze==maybe. But away from the shoreline, back in the scaveola, I would think would be pretty miserable. I'll defer to those that have been there, but Id say pretty warm. AND---if stuck inside the Electra ---would be maybe 125*+. Not fun.
Does add some credence to the radio signals at nite. Might actually be pleasant there in the evening---but again I'll defer to Andrew and others that have been there.
Tom
I grew up in Chicago which is located on the shore of Lake Michigan. The weather forecasts in summer always included the phrase "and cooler by the lake."  Now I live near LA and the TV weather always shows cooler near the ocean. As I said before, the only reason I would hack my way inland through the scaveola is if I could see a lit up "McDonald's" sign in the distance.

As for water, if you have fuel to burn, you can always distill that unlimited supply of salt water into fresh. All it takes is a metal container, maybe fashioned out of a piece of aluminum from the plane, and another piece to have the vapor condense on, or it could be as simple as a piece of cloth on which the water condenses and then wrung out into a container. For fuel, gasoline to start the fire and wood to keep it burning.

And don't forget, Noonan had some experience in dealing with these types of emergency situations, he was torpedoed three times during the Great War!

gl
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Gary LaPook

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #38 on: July 16, 2012, 11:16:24 AM »

Drought does not equal unbearably high temperatures.

True enough Gary but enduring drought even in moderately high temperatures requires quite a bit of H2o.
True, but it was not in drought in 1937, Maude described as a "lush paradise" that had changed to drought in 1938.

gl
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Bill Roe

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #39 on: July 16, 2012, 11:34:34 AM »

Am I off base here by asking why the subject of the Doldrums hasn't come up?  The island is located smack dab in the middle of the Monsoon Zone, isn't it?

Now that area is just real warm with no or very little wind. 
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Jeff Victor Hayden

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #40 on: July 16, 2012, 12:29:45 PM »

Drought does not equal unbearably high temperatures.

True enough Gary but enduring drought even in moderately high temperatures requires quite a bit of H2o.
True, but it was not in drought in 1937, Maude described as a "lush paradise" that had changed to drought in 1938.

gl
Even truer Gary and, something I noticed in the lambrecht photograph of 1937. there seems to have been plenty of 'weather'
http://tighar.org/smf/index.php/topic,253.195.html
This must be the place
 
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Gary LaPook

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #41 on: July 16, 2012, 09:58:57 PM »

Am I off base here by asking why the subject of the Doldrums hasn't come up?  The island is located smack dab in the middle of the Monsoon Zone, isn't it?

Now that area is just real warm with no or very little wind.
Not the doldrums, they are located under the permanent high pressure areas at about 30 degrees north and south which also cause the large areas of deserts in both hemispheres. Nor are these islands in a monsoon weather area which requires the proximity of a continent.

gl
« Last Edit: July 16, 2012, 10:03:51 PM by Gary LaPook »
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Mark Pearce

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #42 on: July 16, 2012, 10:51:56 PM »

Follow the link for a short account of conditions faced by the Coast Guard when preparing the Loran base in 1944-
 
http://www.ameliaearhartbook.com/new_page_14.htm

[info lifted from "The Coast Guard at War IV: Loran, Vol. II" (Public Information Division, USCG Headquarters 1946) More on the Loran station can be found here- http://www.loran-history.info/Gardner_Island/gardner.htm
 
…CLEARING GARDNER ISLAND SITE…

“…The job of clearing a circle of 300 feet radius, for the antenna poles and ground cables, and enough area outside the circle to build the station, was begun by cutting a path from the camp to the center of the circle. Standing in the center of this circle, the trees and vines were so dense that the sky could not be seen, and no sea breeze could penetrate. Palm trees, native hardwood trees, and dense jungle growth covered the entire area. The bulldozer began pushing the brush and vines out of the way, and then attacked the smaller trees. Soon the remaining trees were too deeply rooted for the bulldozer to uproot and fell by itself. These trees were out down by the men, and the stumps were blown out with charges of dynamite. Most of the work had to be done by the bulldozer, not only because it was the most logical way of handling the job, but also because the men could not stand up under the terrific tropical sun. Gardner Island is only four degrees from the equator. These men, who were picked for their physical stamina, found themselves exhausted after a few hors [sic] in the jungle...”


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Gary LaPook

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Re: Temperatures on Gardner
« Reply #43 on: July 17, 2012, 12:58:41 AM »

Follow the link for a short account of conditions faced by the Coast Guard when preparing the Loran base in 1944-
 
http://www.ameliaearhartbook.com/new_page_14.htm

[info lifted from "The Coast Guard at War IV: Loran, Vol. II" (Public Information Division, USCG Headquarters 1946) More on the Loran station can be found here- http://www.loran-history.info/Gardner_Island/gardner.htm
 
…CLEARING GARDNER ISLAND SITE…

“…The job of clearing a circle of 300 feet radius, for the antenna poles and ground cables, and enough area outside the circle to build the station, was begun by cutting a path from the camp to the center of the circle. Standing in the center of this circle, the trees and vines were so dense that the sky could not be seen, and no sea breeze could penetrate. Palm trees, native hardwood trees, and dense jungle growth covered the entire area. The bulldozer began pushing the brush and vines out of the way, and then attacked the smaller trees. Soon the remaining trees were too deeply rooted for the bulldozer to uproot and fell by itself. These trees were out down by the men, and the stumps were blown out with charges of dynamite. Most of the work had to be done by the bulldozer, not only because it was the most logical way of handling the job, but also because the men could not stand up under the terrific tropical sun. Gardner Island is only four degrees from the equator. These men, who were picked for their physical stamina, found themselves exhausted after a few hors [sic] in the jungle...”
Right, it is hot inland so stay on the beach.

gl
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