Advanced search  
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Down

Author Topic: XC-35  (Read 33334 times)

Sheila Shigley

  • TIGHAR member
  • *
  • Posts: 133
Re: XC-35
« Reply #30 on: October 23, 2011, 02:30:34 PM »

But that said, I'll stop posting on XC-35 (unless I find any reference to 10-E)...

Here's one last nice closeup:



http://www.flickr.com/photos/museumandy/4524576057/in/photostream/lightbox/
« Last Edit: October 23, 2011, 03:36:25 PM by Sheila Shigley »
Logged

Martin X. Moleski, SJ

  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 2962
Re: XC-35
« Reply #31 on: October 23, 2011, 04:58:50 PM »

But the R-1340-43 wasn't more powerful than the S3H1 it was limited to the same 550 hp continuous and it did not even put out as much power as the S3H1 for takeoff since this was also limited to 550 hp while the S3H1 put out 600 hp for takeoff.

OK.  Thanks for the correction.

So Sheila thought she had found a more powerful engine that Wemple might have installed in NR16020 ...
LTM,

           Marty
           TIGHAR #2359A
 
Logged

Ric Gillespie

  • Executive Director
  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 5742
  • "Do not try. Do or do not. There is no try" Yoda
Re: XC-35
« Reply #32 on: October 23, 2011, 09:28:22 PM »

But that said, I'll stop posting on XC-35 (unless I find any reference to 10-E)...

Thank you.
Logged

Sheila Shigley

  • TIGHAR member
  • *
  • Posts: 133
Re: XC-35
« Reply #33 on: October 23, 2011, 09:37:40 PM »

But the R-1340-43 wasn't more powerful than the S3H1 it was limited to the same 550 hp continuous and it did not even put out as much power as the S3H1 for takeoff since this was also limited to 550 hp while the S3H1 put out 600 hp for takeoff.

OK.  Thanks for the correction.

So Sheila thought she had found a more powerful engine that Wemple might have installed in NR16020 ...

What's the definition of power--speed or fuel efficiency?

Johnson was looking at the turbo aspect (thanks again to Gary for the after-engine turbo info) for a reason; in XC-35's case, it seems to be speed (power?) at altitude; however, his parallel goal was endurance.  If he chose 1340-43s in the end (which he did), it's reasonable to ask whether the after-engine turbo aspect contributed to overall endurance.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2011, 09:42:14 PM by Sheila Shigley »
Logged

Gary LaPook

  • T5
  • *****
  • Posts: 1624
Re: XC-35
« Reply #34 on: October 24, 2011, 12:54:31 AM »

But the R-1340-43 wasn't more powerful than the S3H1 it was limited to the same 550 hp continuous and it did not even put out as much power as the S3H1 for takeoff since this was also limited to 550 hp while the S3H1 put out 600 hp for takeoff.

OK.  Thanks for the correction.

So Sheila thought she had found a more powerful engine that Wemple might have installed in NR16020 ...

What's the definition of power--speed or fuel efficiency?

Johnson was looking at the turbo aspect (thanks again to Gary for the after-engine turbo info) for a reason; in XC-35's case, it seems to be speed (power?) at altitude; however, his parallel goal was endurance.  If he chose 1340-43s in the end (which he did), it's reasonable to ask whether the after-engine turbo aspect contributed to overall endurance.
------------------------

The R-1340-43 was "sea level rated." This means that the power output of the engine started dropping off as soon as the plane started climbing. (The power output of engines gets less and less as a plane climbs due to the air getting thinner and thinner as you climb. The purpose of superchargers is to allow the engine to make full power at high altitude.) Since the power output lessened then the plane would reach its ceiling and couldn't climb any higher. The reason to add the turbocharger to the system was to add more "boost" so that the plane could climb to very high altitude. The turbocharger also supplied the compressed air needed to pressurize the cabin which was the true reason for this experimental plane.

gl
« Last Edit: October 24, 2011, 01:18:52 AM by Gary LaPook »
Logged

Sheila Shigley

  • TIGHAR member
  • *
  • Posts: 133
Re: XC-35
« Reply #35 on: October 25, 2011, 08:10:29 AM »

The R-1340-43 was "sea level rated." This means that the power output of the engine started dropping off as soon as the plane started climbing. (The power output of engines gets less and less as a plane climbs due to the air getting thinner and thinner as you climb. The purpose of superchargers is to allow the engine to make full power at high altitude.) Since the power output lessened then the plane would reach its ceiling and couldn't climb any higher. The reason to add the turbocharger to the system was to add more "boost" so that the plane could climb to very high altitude. The turbocharger also supplied the compressed air needed to pressurize the cabin which was the true reason for this experimental plane.


Thanks for this, Gary!  I'm also finding refs to turbocharges boosting efficiency (Wiki: "A turbocharger may also be used to increase fuel efficiency without any attempt to increase power...increased temperature from the higher pressure gives a higher Carnot efficiency.") 
Logged

Ric Gillespie

  • Executive Director
  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 5742
  • "Do not try. Do or do not. There is no try" Yoda
Re: XC-35
« Reply #36 on: October 25, 2011, 08:25:25 AM »

Sheila,
I thought you agreed to stop this pointless thread.  If you don't, I will.
Logged

Monty Fowler

  • T5
  • *****
  • Posts: 1078
  • "The real answer is always the right answer."
Re: XC-35
« Reply #37 on: October 26, 2011, 08:11:18 PM »

"But I don't want to get on the cart ..."

"Oh, don't be such a baby!"

LTM,
Monty Fowler
TIGHAR No. 2189CER
Ex-TIGHAR member No. 2189 E C R SP, 1998-2016
 
Logged

Jeff Lange

  • TIGHAR member
  • *
  • Posts: 130
Re: XC-35
« Reply #38 on: October 27, 2011, 09:41:57 AM »

Shame on you Marty- someone always leads us back to Monty Python!

Jeff Lange #0748C
Jeff Lange

# 0748CR
 
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Up
 

Copyright 2020 by TIGHAR, a non-profit foundation. No portion of the TIGHAR Website may be reproduced by xerographic, photographic, digital or any other means for any purpose. No portion of the TIGHAR Website may be stored in a retrieval system, copied, transmitted or transferred in any form or by any means, whether electronic, mechanical, digital, photographic, magnetic or otherwise, for any purpose without the express, written permission of TIGHAR. All rights reserved.

Contact us at: info@tighar.org • Phone: 610-467-1937 • Membership formwebmaster@tighar.org

Powered by MySQL SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines Powered by PHP