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Author Topic: Taraia object  (Read 2016 times)

Don White

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Re: Taraia object
« Reply #45 on: September 23, 2020, 07:55:24 AM »

When I saw Ric's reply to my three options, I thought, it's coconut palms, and that seems to be the growing consensus.

It appears that a tree gets washed in, captured for a while, then washes out again. Thus some photos show an object and others don't. There is only a tree there sometimes (Schrodinger's tree?).

But why only one? Is there some reason that only one tree would be captured there, or does it just happen there has only been one on those occasions?

Where do the trees go after that? Is there a place where they accumulate, or are they washed back out to sea?

Are there stray coconut logs around the lagoon shores?

Don

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Ric Gillespie

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Re: Taraia object
« Reply #46 on: September 23, 2020, 08:19:56 AM »

It appears that a tree gets washed in, captured for a while, then washes out again. Thus some photos show an object and others don't. There is only a tree there sometimes (Schrodinger's tree?).

There's an object there for a few years. Sometimes it's more visible than others. High versus low tide seems to be the best explanation.

But why only one?

Because for the most part, cocos are not prone to being washed into the lagoon.  Most are inland.  The southern shore of the main passage is the only place where cocos grow near the water in a spot that gets clobbered by storms.

Is there some reason that only one tree would be captured there, or does it just happen there has only been one on those occasions?

It's a logical place for a log to wash up but it's a rare event.

Where do the trees go after that? Is there a place where they accumulate, or are they washed back out to sea?

 Stuff does appear, and then disappear, from the lagoon shore.  For several years there was a big rusty tank on the lagoon shore over by Kanawa Point.  Then it went away. I don't know where stuff goes but I don't think anything in the lagoon gets washed back out to sea. There's plenty of force to wash things into the lagoon but very little force going the other way.

Are there stray coconut logs around the lagoon shores?

If there's a coconut log graveyard, I've never seen it.  I suspect what few logs wash the lagoon eventually get waterlogged enough to sink to the bottom and get covered with silt..
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Christian Stock

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Re: Taraia object
« Reply #47 on: September 23, 2020, 09:03:08 AM »


Is there some reason that only one tree would be captured there, or does it just happen there has only been one on those occasions?

It's a logical place for a log to wash up but it's a rare event.



I don't have any first-hand experience with the tides there, but it looks like at least some of the ocean water flowing in from Tatiman creates a clockwise current around the Northern part of the lagoon. That's probably what caused that sandbar to build up at Taraia. That same action would cause the log to get hung up on the sandbar. It also makes sense that airplane parts that were originally on the reef North of the passage would wash up in that area rather than in the main body of the lagoon.
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Ric Gillespie

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Re: Taraia object
« Reply #48 on: September 23, 2020, 09:08:56 AM »

It also makes sense that airplane parts that were originally on the reef North of the passage would wash up in that area rather than in the main body of the lagoon.

And that is where a former Niku resident told us he saw airplane wreckage sometime in the 1950s, but if
it was there then it seems to be gone now, either from being salvaged by locals or washed away - or both.
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MichaelAshmore

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Re: Taraia object
« Reply #49 on: September 24, 2020, 11:33:45 AM »

Or once again being covered by silt/sand while being forgotten,
until Niku resident recalls wreckage years later.
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Ric Gillespie

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Re: Taraia object
« Reply #50 on: September 24, 2020, 12:23:28 PM »

If we were there we'd go check it out, but it certainly doesn't warrant a dedicated expedition.  At the moment, there is nothing that justifies the immense expense of another trip to the island.  The last expedition that produced positive evidence was Niku VI in 2010.  The 5 expeditions since then (TIGHAR in 2012,  TIGHAR in 2015, Betchart in 2015, Betchart in 2017, and Nat Geo in 2019) have found zip. Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.
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Jon Romig

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Re: Taraia object
« Reply #51 on: September 26, 2020, 06:38:36 PM »

Sorry if I am beating a tired drum, but if a part of the Electra had had sufficient buoyancy to end up on Taraia, it certainly had sufficient buoyancy to drift just about anywhere else around Niku, and much more likely to have. I think the Electra may indeed have sunk at sea as many surmise, however not near Howland but near Niku. Those spending millions scanning the sea bottom elsewhere would do well to turn their sights onto a few square miles near Niku, focusing on the deep areas that haven’t yet been searched.

Unfortunately, the last five expeditions were proven to be under-resourced for the kind of deep search (literal and figurative) now required, after the “easy” successes of TIGHAR’s early days. Let’s hope that in the future searches becomes much more affordable and effective due to inevitable advances in artificial intelligence, robotics and remote sensing.

Earhart searchers of the future may well look back on TIGHAR’s efforts the way contemporary explorers admire Shackleton from the relative comfort and safety of McMurdo Station. Those who participated in TIGHAR’s expeditions were and are heroes in my book.

Jon
Jon Romig 3562R
 
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MichaelAshmore

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Re: Taraia object
« Reply #52 on: September 27, 2020, 01:00:10 PM »

Although a separate trip to Niku is not cost effective. An in-depth search of the lagoon would be more likely to have results than the extensive cost of deep exploration surrounding the island.
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