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Author Topic: Solomons Oral History Report  (Read 6087 times)

Ric Gillespie

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Solomons Oral History Report
« on: December 01, 2014, 05:01:05 PM »

The final report on the 2011 TIGHAR research expedition to the Solomon Islands to interview former residents of Nikumaroro is now up on the TIGHAR website.  This is an excellent piece of research by a dedicated and talented team.
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Jay Burkett

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Re: Solomons Oral History Report
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2014, 11:50:50 AM »

Very nicely done!  Thanks for posting it for us to read.

I would like to know the "rest of the story" regarding the museum visit and the "research permit" requirement!  Very strange.
Jay Burkett, N4RBY
Aerospace Engineer
Fairhope AL
 
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Andrew M McKenna

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Re: Solomons Oral History Report
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2014, 01:32:54 PM »

This is an item that I certainly find interesting:

"Most interesting among Taniana’s memories of Nikumaroro Island, consisting of new anecdotal evidence to TIGHAR, was his recollection of finding shiny metal debris, including what he described as “the door of an airplane” on the beach, and just inland of the beach of an area he
called “Nairapu” (spelling unclear) near Bauareke Passage,..."

To think that such a diagnostic artifact might be lying about on Nikumaroro waiting to be found is very intriguing. 

Andrew
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Chris Johnson

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Re: Solomons Oral History Report
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2014, 01:33:19 PM »

Some observations:

1. Is there evidence from your excavations of a difference between fire features i.e Typical fire pit native against other (castaway) fire features?

2. Did anyone press the interviewee's for details on the construction of Gallagher's summer house to tie it in with the items found at the seven site (cast iron sheets, copper wire mesh, roof felt etc..)?

3. Is it conclusive that there is evidence of burning on the TIGHAR aluminium sheet?

I can see the doubters having a field day with this report suggesting that it disproves the 7 site when it opens up many more questions over what has been discovered and how to interpret that. 
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Chris Johnson

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Re: Solomons Oral History Report
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2014, 01:35:48 PM »

This is an item that I certainly find interesting:

"Most interesting among Taniana’s memories of Nikumaroro Island, consisting of new anecdotal evidence to TIGHAR, was his recollection of finding shiny metal debris, including what he described as “the door of an airplane” on the beach, and just inland of the beach of an area he
called “Nairapu” (spelling unclear) near Bauareke Passage,..."

To think that such a diagnostic artifact might be lying about on Nikumaroro waiting to be found is very intriguing. 

Andrew

Wouldn't the islanders see such an item as a valuable object to be resourced once discovered?  It may no long be on whole piece but you never know until you look!

It begs the question what other major pieces of the plane could easily be detached from the wreckage and float ashore?
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