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Author Topic: Trip to Nikumaroro  (Read 53504 times)

Ric Gillespie

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #30 on: January 16, 2014, 11:52:57 AM »

The webpage for the manufacturer of the yellow one mentions that it is "designed specifically for the tourist and transport industries," and that it "comfortably seats 25 passengers plus 1-crew"

Looks like it would be the perfect solution -but the cost would probably be prohibitive. We'll look into it.
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Monty Fowler

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #31 on: January 17, 2014, 08:15:08 AM »

Maybe they have a rent-to-own program, or we could lease one in return for them geting the publicity exposure?

LTM,
Monty Fowler, TIGHAR No. 2189 CER
Ex-TIGHAR member No. 2189 E C R SP, 1998-2016
 
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Ric Gillespie

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #32 on: January 17, 2014, 09:41:56 AM »

The Betchart folks are in Fiji now looking at possible ships.  We'll investigate the hovercraft angle.
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Tim Mellon

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #33 on: January 17, 2014, 11:50:45 AM »

I like the yellow one.  I wonder if a hovercraft is a real possibility.  On a fairly calm day a hovercraft could go ashore over the reef pretty much anywhere.

I can imagine that the owners would be concerned about tearing the rubber inflation cushion on the sharp coral reef.
Tim
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PanAm Systems

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Dan Swift

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #34 on: January 17, 2014, 01:36:35 PM »

After the success of this coming expedition, can you imagine the crowd wanting to go to Niku! 
I would love to go, but I would probably fall and hurt myself on the reef....and then I would have to sue you....and well there's been enough of that lately! 
TIGHAR Member #4154
 
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John Ousterhout

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #35 on: January 17, 2014, 07:16:59 PM »

Temporary bridging?  I have contacts in my old union (IATSE local #5), or maybe the Coast Guard Construction Battalions, if they're still in existence.  Would there be engineering help available from Kirabati?  I'm thinking that Niku could be a revenue source worth investing some infrastructure into, such as hard-points to mount temporary scaffolding to on the reef.  That way the gov't could control (easy/safe) access.
Cheers,
JohnO
 
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Greg Daspit

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #36 on: January 17, 2014, 07:32:35 PM »

I had a crazy idea but a little google search and of course someone already thought of the Balloon Crane
Imagine picking up something like a windowed RV with the class and setting it down next the Camp Zero.  Lecture, then, load up and be carried for a tree top tour over to the Seven Site. Well, maybe Niku XIII
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« Last Edit: January 17, 2014, 07:59:51 PM by Greg Daspit »
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richie conroy

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #37 on: January 17, 2014, 07:40:55 PM »

How about the cheapest, tried and tested way  :)



You could easy float a bouncy castle onto reef to land on  ;D
We are an echo of the past


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richie conroy

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #38 on: January 17, 2014, 07:46:50 PM »

Do you reckon he makes land haha

We are an echo of the past


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Dale O. Beethe

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #39 on: January 17, 2014, 07:59:37 PM »

I like the yellow one.  I wonder if a hovercraft is a real possibility.  On a fairly calm day a hovercraft could go ashore over the reef pretty much anywhere.

I can imagine that the owners would be concerned about tearing the rubber inflation cushion on the sharp coral reef.
If it's like the LCAC I rode to the beach in Somalia, you shouldn't have to worry about tearing the skirt.  It never touches the ground (or water) until it stops and comes down off the "air cushion".
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Chris Austin

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #40 on: January 20, 2014, 04:36:28 AM »

Quote from: Ric Gillespie link=topic=1413.msg29541#msg29541
Among the biggest concerns are ship-to-shore transitions.

You need some Mulberries.

I can source a "used" example. It may need a bit of Spackle, or Polyfilla as we know it. Shipping charges may be a bit harsh, too.

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2626129/
« Last Edit: January 20, 2014, 05:17:34 AM by Martin X. Moleski, SJ »
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JNev

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #41 on: January 20, 2014, 08:51:45 AM »

As to the hovercraft, I like the "OMG!" size, given the hazards at Niku.

As to the notion of a trebuchet-type solution, here is a local variant that might be adapted for ship-board application... of course some form of anti-rebound / occupant release would also have to be devised.  Don't try this at home, kids.

- Jeff Neville

Former Member 3074R
 
« Last Edit: January 20, 2014, 08:54:53 AM by Jeffrey Neville »
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Jeff Victor Hayden

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #42 on: January 20, 2014, 06:13:53 PM »

Quote from: Ric Gillespie link=topic=1413.msg29541#msg29541
Among the biggest concerns are ship-to-shore transitions.

You need some Mulberries.

A personal history lesson Marty on the Mulberry harbour

As a kid I was brought up and lived in a village called Stanwell. As a youngster I had a paper round and used to deliver to a road called Mulberry Avenue, never saw any Mulberry bushes there  ???

It wasn't until much later I learned that it was named after the famous Mulberry harbour because the guy who designed them lived at Stanwell Place, a big rambling country home in the village.

"Sir John Watson Gibson OBE (9 August 1885 - 19 March 1947) was a civil engineering contractor who built the Sennar and Gebel Aulia Dams in Sudan and coordinated the construction of the Phoenix concrete caisson breakwaters for the 'artificial' Mulberry Harbours"


Born
9 August 1885
27 Pembroke Street, Middlesbrough, North Riding of Yorkshire, Great Britain

Died
19 March 1947
Stanwell Place, Stanwell, Middlesex, Great Britain

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:John_Godden/Subpage1

"The Gibbons family sold Stanwell Place to civil engineer Sir John Watson Gibson in 1933. Gibson moved to Stanwell whilst building the Queen Mary Reservoir at Littleton,(the largest water storage reservoir in the world at that time). Living at Stanwell Lodge before his purchase of Stanwell Place (90 acres), and the adjoining Stanhope farm (261 acres, including Hammonds farm).[4] In 1936 the Metropolitan Water Board bought most of Gibson's estate, in a contract encompassing 346 acres.[5] It used this land in 1947 on which to develop the King George VI Reservoir.[4]

During the World War II Gibson through his work as deputy director-general civil engineering (special) at the Ministry of Supply (1943–4) he was one of the principal people responsible for the construction of the top secret Mulberry Harbours. It was as a result of this that he lent Stanwell Place to the SHAEF Commanders where they held two top level meetings during the build up to D-Day and the Normandy Invasion. The American high command including Henry L. Stimson, General George C. Marshall, General Dwight D. Eisenhower, Admiral Ernest J. King and General of the Air Force Henry H. Arnold stayed at Stanwell Place during the meetings.[6]

After Gibson’s death, Stanwell Place and its residual 22acres were sold to King Faisal II of Iraq. Gibson's sons still owned the residual 17 acres of Stanhope farm.[5] After the assassination of King Faisal in 1958,[3] the estate was purchased for gravel extraction. Despite local attempts to prevent it, the house was allowed to become derelict and eventually knocked down."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanwell_Place

As kids we used to play in the Iraqi woods as we all knew them because of the connection with the owner King Faisal of Iraq.

Small world




This must be the place
 
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Martin X. Moleski, SJ

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #43 on: January 20, 2014, 08:47:28 PM »

A personal history lesson Marty on the Mulberry harbour ...

Small world

Thanks, Jeff!

I've only read about the artificial harbors.

I used to use an e-mail program called "Mulberry."  Its name had nothing to do with the concrete caissons or the Iraq woods, but I remember it with affection and gratitude.
LTM,

           Marty
           TIGHAR #2359A
 
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Karen Hoy

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Re: Trip to Nikumaroro
« Reply #44 on: February 20, 2014, 07:59:04 PM »

What physical and mental capabilities is TIGHAR looking for in participants on the Niku trip in 2015?

Is there some kind of screening criteria? I am about to put in a deposit, so I'm just wondering if I qualify.

LTM (who is always prepared)

Karen Hoy 2610CER
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