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Author Topic: GLENN MILLER  (Read 3489 times)

Richard Lyon Metzger

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GLENN MILLER
« on: December 20, 2017, 09:47:41 PM »

The hypothesis is that a trawler pulled up a silver Norseman off the coast of Portland Bill, Dorset.
If you look at a map of England / France, Portland Bill is west of London.
Cambridgeshire, where the Glenn Miller plane took off from is located northeast of London.
Paris, France is south south west of Cambridgeshire and the line between them would have the aircraft pass EAST of London.
The plane, if it had made it to France would have passed over the coast area around Eu and Ault, France.


"The Big Band Era"
« Last Edit: December 20, 2017, 09:50:32 PM by Richard Lyon Metzger »
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Don White

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Re: GLENN MILLER
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2017, 08:57:47 PM »

Unless there's a documented flight path or logical explanation for why Miller would have flown such an indirect route, it would appear the hypothesis is disproved before the search begins.
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Kurt Kummer

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Re: GLENN MILLER
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2017, 01:02:25 PM »

There may be a logical explanation to the flightpath Don.  According to Brian Dunning in "The Disappearance of Glenn Miller 03/18/2014" the pilot "was required to follow a specific air transport route called the SHAEF Corridor once he left Twinwood; passing AAF Bovingdon, navigation waypoints at Maidenhead and Beachy Head, and then across the channel to a French waypoint at Fecamp,and finally landing at AAF Villacoublay just south of Paris.  Estimated time of arrival was between 15:47 and 15:51.  The Royal Observation Corps spotted the Norseman heading out over the water from Beachy Head at approximately 14:37, precisely on course and on schedule."

If you look at a map of England and France, you can see how that route would have taken Miller S from Twinwood, SSW to Maidenhead and then more SE around London and on to the Channel.

Obviously Ric and TIGHAR have a lot of research to do, but the hypothesis isn't disproved yet IMO.  We'll see how it goes.
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Simon Ellwood

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Re: GLENN MILLER
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2017, 03:49:52 AM »

Yes, I'd agree that Portland Bill seems to be, at first sight something like 100nm west of the SHAEF corridor Miller's plane was supposed to be following. Seems a little far to have strayed while airbourne or drifted under current - but let's see what TIGHAR's report says as to credibility.

Note: there's now a new 'Glenn Miller' section at the top of the forum for future posts.
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Martin X. Moleski, SJ

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Re: GLENN MILLER
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2017, 06:51:39 AM »

Note: there's now a new 'Glenn Miller' section at the top of the forum for future posts.

DOH.

I should have moved this there yesterday.

Better late than never!

It's here now.



LTM,

           Marty
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Martin X. Moleski, SJ

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Re: GLENN MILLER
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2017, 07:07:02 AM »

There may be a logical explanation to the flightpath Don.  According to Brian Dunning in "The Disappearance of Glenn Miller 03/18/2014" the pilot "was required to follow a specific air transport route called the SHAEF Corridor once he left Twinwood; passing AAF Bovingdon, navigation waypoints at Maidenhead and Beachy Head, and then across the channel to a French waypoint at Fecamp,and finally landing at AAF Villacoublay just south of Paris.  Estimated time of arrival was between 15:47 and 15:51.  The Royal Observation Corps spotted the Norseman heading out over the water from Beachy Head at approximately 14:37, precisely on course and on schedule."

"The Disappearance of Glenn Miller" seems to be a good starting point for discussion.
LTM,

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Dennis M Spragg

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Re: GLENN MILLER
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2018, 02:54:38 PM »

The History Detectives program was a pleasure to appear in and assist. I was concerned because of having a forthcoming book but the producers agreed not to touch about 90% of what I was preparing. They preserved the integrity of the book, for which I was very grateful.

So, for example, they drew a line to not include the conclusive information about the Lancasters that I already had and, as with the Anderton logbook, they opted to present a 15-20 minute "bump" in flight time for the C-64 to the southwest along the required transport route rather than completely throw dear Roy Nesbit under the bus. Roy was still alive when the program segments were recorded during the summer and fall of 2013 and he passed in the spring of 2014 before the episode aired on PBS (July 2014). But I already knew the Lancsters were completely out of the picture, given BST vs. GMT and the clearly evident AAF and RAF documentation for that day. I knew at the time the Lancasters were all back at their aerodromes by 14:45A and the jettisons were all logged in squadron records between 13:04A and 13:21A, with some errant drops to the east and north of the jettison coordinates right over the western transport corridor and a ferry flight of Ninth Air Force L-1 aircraft, which was reported at the time, even in the February 1, 1945 issue of Stars and Stripes. The 149 Squadron Lancaster with Fred Shaw aboard, the navigator who claimed to see a Norseman go into the water, was back on the ground at Methwold and logged in at 14:20A.

The producers spent considerable time with the alleged clandestine operations angle for Miller, considering that the AAF Band was billeted in Bedford along with many BBC operations and Bedfordshire was coincidentally the location of some special operations activities. The closest Miller got to anything resembling anti-enemy activity were Office of War Information Voice of America ABSIE (American Broadcasting Station in Europe) broadcasts in the German language, which he did not speak. ABSIE was the wartime London-based European Service of the VOA.

One thing the producers also did that I appreciated was the hands-on visit with a flyable Norseman in Canada and I will never forget the pilot telling us that ice can easily form in the engine (and all over the aircraft) and that the old float-type carburetors originally on the plane were nasty. That and getting into a Lancaster did quite a bit to further my hands-on appreciation for the aircraft involved.

But the History Detectives episode is a mostly OK introduction before getting into further detail and the book.

Dennis

 
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 03:00:35 PM by Dennis M Spragg »
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