Advanced search  
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down

Author Topic: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?  (Read 21107 times)

Todd Attebery

  • T1
  • *
  • Posts: 21
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2015, 10:13:30 AM »

Several months back I was doing a google search of Gallaghers family and ran across this.

http://www.dnw.co.uk/auction-archive/catalogue-archive/lot.php?department=Medals&lot_id=68987

I believe these are medals issued to Gallaghers mother.  There could be another Edith Annie Gallagher but it is consistant with the work she did during the war noted here:  http://tighar.org/wiki/Gerald_Gallagher

I personally don't have time to research it, but this could be a lead to what happend to "Gallagher's Effects" if soneone else in the forum wants to roll with it.   It's a very long shot since we would have to assume that Gallagher's Effects were shipped to his mother and that his items were eventually "disposed of" in the same manner as these medals (assuming they belonged to his mother)....and the successive owners of these medals since her death in 1981 can be traced. 

I e-mailed the auction house to find out if they had a record of the seller.  They confirmed that they did, but did not provide the information to me.  They said they would notify the seller, but I never received any feedback.
Logged

Bill Mangus

  • TIGHAR member
  • *
  • Posts: 262
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2015, 10:24:08 AM »

Hi Marty,

I found a web site that has a listing, with photographs, of the ships operated by the W. R. C. Carpenter Shipping Company in 1945.  I cannot say it's all inclusive but from the way the site is constructed it seems to be accurate.  Go here:

http://www.flotilla-australia.com/wrc.htm

There seem to be only two possibilities from this listing, the SS Suva and the SS Salamaua/Lautoka.

I found a logbook for the SS Suva for 1945 here (it's about half-way down):

http://www.navy.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/ST_MARGARET_TO_TAMBAR.pdf

From this it appears she never left the Pacific in 1945.

The SS Salamaua/Lautoka is a real possibility.  She did RAN service in WWII and made at least one trip to the Med, no doubt through the Suez Canal.  I did find a site that says her movement logbook is held by the AU Nat'l Archives but is not on-line. It's here:

http://ww2talk.com/forums/topic/16396-s-s-salamuia/

Perhaps one of our Aussie members could find and review the logbook and see if she made a trip to the UK in 1945 or early '46.

There are other ships in operation in 1945 but they seem too small for a voyage of that length.

There may be other sources out there; this is just what came up on Google.

What ever the ship, it would have had to clear UK Customs when it docked.  A copy of the passenger/cargo manifest would be provided to Customs.  That manifest would almost certainly have the name of the company or agency WRC Carpenter consigned the cargo to for final delivery, or in the case of the missing possessions, the name of the person to be contacted when the 4 trunks were available for pickup.  This may give us a starting point for Gallagher's descendants to start investigating, if they're still interested.  In any case in has the potential to uncover more information.

Bill Mangus
Researcher #3054SP
 
« Last Edit: September 29, 2015, 11:09:51 AM by Bill Mangus »
Logged

Bill Mangus

  • TIGHAR member
  • *
  • Posts: 262
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #17 on: September 29, 2015, 11:38:14 AM »

Here's a photo of the SS Salamaua/Lautoka.
Bill Mangus
Researcher #3054SP
 
Logged

Martin X. Moleski, SJ

  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 2882
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #18 on: September 29, 2015, 11:41:44 AM »

I found a web site that has a listing, with photographs, of the ships operated by the W. R. C. Carpenter Shipping Company in 1945.  I cannot say it's all inclusive but from the way the site is constructed it seems to be accurate.

Good detective work!

But we don't know that the Shipping Company necessarily delivered all of its shipments by itself.

They may have gone to a central port and handed things over to an intermediary that would complete the shipment to England.

(I'm totally ignorant of how these things worked in reality--this is just imagination in play.)

Quote
This may give us a starting point for Gallagher's descendants to start investigating, if they're still interested.

Gallagher died childless, so far as we know.

We have been in touch with his nephew.

His nephew knows the rest of the family.

Dunno whether more facts about the shipping method is going to change the fact that the nephew could not turn up any of the material or any history of the material by talking with the members of GG's family.
LTM,

           Marty
           TIGHAR #2359A
 
Logged

Bill Mangus

  • TIGHAR member
  • *
  • Posts: 262
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #19 on: September 29, 2015, 12:23:25 PM »

But we don't know that the Shipping Company necessarily delivered all of its shipments by itself.

They may have gone to a central port and handed things over to an intermediary that would complete the shipment to England.

All true, but the Suva did make a voyage to London in 1944, so there's a history of WRC Carpenter ship(s) making that trip.  The Salamaua was a more modern ship than the Suva.  Perhaps the Salamaua took over that route.

If the manifest could be found it may have information that would jog the family's memory.
Bill Mangus
Researcher #3054SP
 
« Last Edit: September 29, 2015, 03:01:19 PM by Bruce Thomas »
Logged

Martin X. Moleski, SJ

  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 2882
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #20 on: September 29, 2015, 03:42:29 PM »

If the manifest could be found it may have information that would jog the family's memory.

See the article on the missing trunks for most of the story.

"Gerald's mother asked that his personal effects be returned to a Miss. Clancy [Julie Marie Clancy] who was her sister and lived at Clanmere, Graham Road, Malvern, Worcester, England. Edith Gallagher had been engaged in war work in London and apparently considered the Malvern address to be more permanent than her own."

The rest of the information is in "Gerald Gallagher's Effects." Items 30 and 31 on that list are the ones that hold the most promise, in my view.
LTM,

           Marty
           TIGHAR #2359A
 
« Last Edit: September 29, 2015, 03:45:06 PM by Martin X. Moleski, SJ »
Logged

Bill Mangus

  • TIGHAR member
  • *
  • Posts: 262
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2015, 02:26:15 PM »

I've since found a logbook entry for the MV Salamaua.  It's here, about half-way down.  Looks like she didn't leave the Pacific in '45 or '46 either.

     http://www.navy.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/RONAKI_TO_SAMUEL_HEINTZELMAN.pdf

Bill Mangus
Researcher #3054SP
 
Logged

Steve Robertson

  • TIGHAR member
  • *
  • Posts: 3
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #22 on: October 21, 2015, 10:15:04 PM »

Bill,
I've found this a useful reference:

   http://www.navy.gov.au/media-room/publications/wwii-merchant-ship-movement-records-australia

It contains scans of the Australian WWII Merchant Ship Movement Records cards. I have been through most of these, looking specifically vessels for which the listed owner is W R Carpenter & Co, or a subsidiary. You might like to download File 37 Lake Ormoc to Loatta and view the cards for Carpenter's vessel LANSING (two cards).

This ship arrived in Suva Port in the evening of 6th August 1945 - a significant day in the war, as any Hiroshima schoolkid would tell you. The next day, the 7th August 1945, the WPHC reportedly asked Carpenter's to pick up Gallagher's trunks of belongings. As I can't locate any other Carpenter's vessel anywhere near Fiji at the time, I remain convinced that the WPHC intended for the shipment to leave on the Lansing.

So where did the Lansing go, and when? Sadly, Lansing's arrival in Suva is the last movement in the record set for that vessel. I can demonstrate from other sources that the Lansing went to Vancouver. But I don't know when, or if she went directly, or via other ports (eg San Francisco and San Pedro, both copra trading ports in the US, feature in Lansing's trans-pacific movement history).

This site has some history on the Lansing (launched as the British Queen in 1890).

   http://www.tynebuiltships.co.uk/B-Ships/britishqueen1890.html

For those wondering what WWII Merchant Ship Movement Records cards are, they are the product of a wartime initiative to protect British and allied merchant shipping from prying enemy eyes. I don't really know how it worked, but basically ships did not carry (among other records) information regarding their movement history. So ship movement records were kept at home. These are Australia's records. The UK has theirs digitised (pay to view). New Zealand still keeps their cards, with some content available on an internet database. Canada had a set, but destroyed them intentionally in the 1950s or thereabouts, citing national security concerns.

I have brought the Lansing to the attention of Tighar HQ quite some time ago, but as I've heard nothing further, I assume there was nothing further to be made of it.
Logged

Bill Mangus

  • TIGHAR member
  • *
  • Posts: 262
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #23 on: October 22, 2015, 07:00:49 AM »

Hey Steve,

That's the site where I got the movement records for the Suva and Salamaua.  I came up with those vessels at this site:

          http://www.flotilla-australia.com/wrc.htm

Lansing isn't listed there, so this is a really good find.

Looks like she made a trip to the US west coast (San Pedro and San Francisco) Sep - Nov '44, came back to Suva in Dec, made a voyage Brisbane - Sydney - Suva then went inactive (for maintenance ?).  Don't know what those three lines in the remarks column mean.  Anyway, one more round robin trip before back to Suva on 6 Aug. 

Since she was sold to China Trading Corp. in '46, I wonder if this was her last trip for Carpenter's.  This would explain why it's the last entry on the second card.

Carpenter's records would have had a date for the sale but they were likely lost in the fire.
Bill Mangus
Researcher #3054SP
 
Logged

Martin X. Moleski, SJ

  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 2882
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #24 on: October 22, 2015, 08:57:06 AM »

I received some info on Carpenter's from Gerry Gallagher via TIGHAR in 2003.

I have a lot of accumulated information that may or may not shed some light
on W.R. Carpenter & Co. Ltd.

The information I have is that the items were crated and made available for
transit through W.R. Carpenter & Co. Ltd (Fiji).

ARCHIVE INFORMATION:

W.R. Carpenter & Co Ltd (1914 - )

Location:
Registered in New South Wales in 1914. In subseqent years the company
tookover or acquired:

1935 W.R. Carpenter & Co (Solomon Islands) Ltd [Registered in New South
Wales, 1922]

1951 W.R. Carpenter & Co (Fiji) Ltd

In 1957 the company was taken over by W.R. Carpenter Holdings Ltd

Some archive material for the company is as follows:


Archives of W R Carpenter & Co Ltd, Tulagi Branch, in Dunedin
When war came to the British Solomon Islands Protectorate in early 1942, the
'commercials,' as businesses were called, left Tulagi, the prewar capital,
to local looters and the invading Japanese. In the turmoil, records,
including some government ones, were lost or destroyed. The first small
group of civilians to return to the Solomons after the war had various
commissions from business interests and individuals. The shipping company,
W.R. Carpenter, asked Tom Elkington, labour recruiter and son of the former
owners of Elkington's Hotel in Tulagi, to look for their safe in Tulagi and
gave him the key. Tom found the safe, sent back to Sydney the material
Carpenter wanted and threw to one side old documents that were to be burned.
They never did get burned; they provided a few laughs for Tom who knew all
the characters mentioned in the letters and branch reports. Over the years,
he all but forgot the papers, in a box stowed away. Then a historian, Judy
Bennett, turned up at Tulagi in the mid 1970s to talk with Tom. He allowed
her to read the papers and she used them in her Wealth of the Solomons: a
history of a Pacific Archipelago, 1800-1978. A few years later, Tom
Elkington with his humour and his vast store of knowledge of the colonial
Solomons died in Brisbane. Fittingly, his ashes were later scattered at
Tulagi by his widow, Naysa. She gave the Carpenter papers to Judy Bennett.
With the permission of Devereau Holdings, the successors of W R Carpenter &
Co Ltd, Dr Bennett kindly allowed the Bureau to film the Tulagi Branch
archives.

The PMB title is as follows:

PMB 1112 W R CARPENTER & CO, TULAGI BRANCH: Branch Manager's correspondence
and related papers, 1925-1932. 1 reel. (Available for reference.)

Thanks to Judy Bennett, History Department, Otago University, for the
substance of this report


Pacific Manuscripts Bureau, Australian National University
Pacific Manuscripts Bureau
Australian National University
Address Room 7012, Coombs Building, Research School of Pacific and Asian
Studies, The Australian National University, Canberra
Postal Address PMB, RSPAS, Australian National University, ACT 0200
Telephone (02) 6249-2521
Fax (02) 6249-0198
Email pambu@coombs.anu.edu.au
URL http://rspas.anu.edu.au/pambu/

Date Range: 1925 - 1932
Description: * Unpublished manuscript (c.1980s) by Ray Melrose "Camohe"
in-house company history from 1860s-1980s.
* On microfilm are papers which were retained by an employee of the
company - letters and branch reports.
* Some material with Dr Judy Bennett (NZ historian), which has been
microfilmed.
* Ewan Maidment of Pacific Manuscripts believes that there are more
surviving records of the company, and is negotiating with its successor,
Devereau Holdings for these to be archived.
Quantity: 1 reel of microfilm
Access: Access through PMB


INTERESTING CONNECTION WITH HARRY MAUDE:

PACIFIC MANUSCRIPTS BUREAU:

As a preliminary to the formation of the Pacific Manuscripts Bureau in 1968,
Harry Maude set out a kind of manifesto in the form of a taxonomy of Pacific
archives, a proportion of which the Bureau would attempt to capture on
microfilm over the following years. ("The Documentary Basis for Pacific
Studies: a report on progress and desiderata", 1967) Maude distinguished two
major classes of archives: (a) official colonial government records -
classified in to the 8 metropolitan colonial powers which had imperial and
economic interests in the Pacific; and (b) unofficial manuscript material
which he considered to be "probably of considerably greater importance"
(p.16) consisting of:

1. records of discovery and exploration.

2. travellers accounts and impressions

3. records of residents

4. mission records

5. trading records

6. whaling records

7. labour trade records

8. planters records and material connected with expatriate agricultural
production

9. political polemics

10. vernacular material of all kinds

11. unpublished research material

12. miscellaneous

13. tape recordings of oral historical and other material

The greatest concentration of manuscript material Maude pointed out was to
be found in the islands themselves. He identified four main categories:

1. territorial and local government records (Note subsequent transfer of
records of WPHC and NHBS from Suva to London.)

2. mission records

3. trading and plantation material

4. private manuscripts

Pambu became very active and successful in copying mission and personal
papers. Pambu also copied some government papers, particularly in Tonga, but
this area was largely beyond its sphere of authority. In the commercial
sphere, Pambu organised a massive project copying logs of American whalers
operating in the Pacific out of New England, however apart from copying
records of some Burns Philp branches in Fiji and a few plantation records,
Pambu was not terribly successful in the fields of trading and plantation
records. Maude was well aware of the problems associated with preserving
business archives: "It is particularly difficult to persuade business firms
(including planters) to permit their books and correspondence to be
preserved in archives, or even to preserve them in their own custody" (p.36)
A friend of Maude's, the General Manager of Morris, Hedstrom & Co, a
well-known island trading firm, refused to comply with Maude's request to
transfer the company's records into archival custody following take over by
W R Carpenter & Co, on the contrary, he personally supervised the burning of
the company's archives. I have persistently tried to track down surviving
records of W R Carpenter & Co over the last 18 months, but there is every
indication that nothing has survived in either Sydney or Suva. Judith
Bennett, the Solomon Islands historian, was given a small batch of
Carpenters, Tulagi Branch, archives which had been rescued from a safe among
the ruins of the Branch office after the War. These may well be the only
surviving records of that company.

Maude wrote that "if the commercial history of the area is...to be written
an urgent and concerted attempt will have to be made by the Pacific Research
Libraries to obtain and preserve every scrap of source material that still
remains undestroyed." (p.37) There is an elaborate network of Pacific
research libraries: at least four in New Zealand, three in Australia, two in
the United States, the USP in Suva, the UPNG in Port Moresby and, to a
lesser extent, the Université Française du Pacifique in Papeete and Noumea.
Efforts were made, at least in Australia and New Zealand, and some
relatively strong archives of Australian and New Zealand firms which have
operated in the Pacific are in custody. The archives of Burns Philp & Co are
intact (at the Noel Butlin Archives Centre at the ANU and at the Bridge
Street Head Office of the firm) but they include only patchy series of
Branch correspondence. The CSR Ltd archives (also at the Noel Butlin
Archives Centre) are probably strongest Pacific commercial archives,
documenting in detail the whole of the company's operations in Fiji. However
the correspondence between the Fiji mills and head office to 1948 is held in
delicate presscopy letterbooks which have a relatively short life
expectancy.


W R CARPENTER (SOUTH PACIFIC) LTD
c/o Carpenters Fiji Ltd
P O Box 299, Suva, Fiji

I contacted them on September 25, 2000 and spoke with a gentleman named
Daniel Vilsoni. I also emailed them as follows:

Dear Daniel,

After speaking with you today I send you this fax in order to obtain
information in regards to a shipment handled by W.R. Carpenter Co. in 1945.

A relative of mine worked for the West Pacific High commission and died in
the Pacific. His personal effects (of which I have a detailed list) were
supposedly shipped (or at least requested to be shipped to a U.K. address.

I include the telegram from the Western Pacific High Commission to W.R.
Carpenter Co. of August 7, 1945. This telegram is the last that has been
heard of these 4 trunks of personal effects of Gerald Gallagher.

Can you please check your archives and advise if indeed this was shipped
(consigned to who in the U.K.?) and send me copies of any relevant paperwork
that you may have in regards to this consignement.

Sincerely Yours,

Gerard Gallagher


This is the information that I can share with you. I never heard back from
Daniel or the company.


They also owned some sea going vessels:

In 1934, W.R.Carpenter & Co. acquired two motor vessels, each of 6,800 tons
gross and renamed them Rabaul and Salamaua registering them both in Suva
Fiji. At the time, they carried Australian and British Deck and Engineer
Officers and a crew of native Fijians. They commenced a service between
Australia Britain and Europe, including calls at Rabaul and other South Sea
Island ports, running a ten weekly service carrying wool, copra, and other
produce. It was the first privately owned shipping line operating between
Australia and England.

Last but not least:

Duranbah. Steel steamship, 284 tons. Built England, 1905. Lbd 130 x 23.1 x
9.2 ft. Sold on arrival in Australia to N.C.S.N.Co.; to W.R. Carpenter Co.
in 1922. Believed captured by the Japanese in WW2.

LTM,

           Marty
           TIGHAR #2359A
 
Logged

Todd Attebery

  • T1
  • *
  • Posts: 21
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #25 on: October 23, 2015, 08:19:10 AM »


Looks like the British Archives has movements as well.

http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D8653452

Logged

Bill Mangus

  • TIGHAR member
  • *
  • Posts: 262
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #26 on: November 18, 2015, 08:56:48 AM »

I've purchased and downloaded the Lansing's movement card from the UK Archives.

I've attached the PDF for examination. 

Looks like she made a voyage from Tutuila (?) to Vancouver to San Francisco to Auckland in late 1945, then a final voyage in 1946 before being sold to the Chinese.

It's possible she carried the trunks to Vancouver/San Francisco for transfer to another ship going to the UK.  Unless another ship is identified somehow, this may be the end of the trail.
Bill Mangus
Researcher #3054SP
 
Logged

Martin X. Moleski, SJ

  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 2882
Re: Where are Gallagher's photographs from Niku?
« Reply #27 on: November 18, 2015, 10:50:44 AM »

I've purchased and downloaded the Lansing's movement card from the UK Archives.

I've attached the PDF for examination. 

Thanks!

It's amazing how much information there is about the past.  "Scripta manent!"
LTM,

           Marty
           TIGHAR #2359A
 
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
 

Copyright 2018 by TIGHAR, a non-profit foundation. No portion of the TIGHAR Website may be reproduced by xerographic, photographic, digital or any other means for any purpose. No portion of the TIGHAR Website may be stored in a retrieval system, copied, transmitted or transferred in any form or by any means, whether electronic, mechanical, digital, photographic, magnetic or otherwise, for any purpose without the express, written permission of TIGHAR. All rights reserved.

Contact us at: info@tighar.org • Phone: 610-467-1937 • Membership formwebmaster@tighar.org

Powered by MySQL SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines Powered by PHP